Tag Archives: sexism

Bechdel Test for movies and for life

What is the Bechdel Test?

The Bechdel Test was published in 1985, in the episode named “The Rule” from the comic “Dykes To Watch Out For“:

dtwof-bechdel-test

 

In summary, the test consists of three rules to analyze a movie:

1. There must be at least two women in it (some add the additional requisite of knowing their names).

2. They must talk to each other.

3. The conversation can’t be about a man.

Although originally it was meant as a humorous resource from a fictional character, eventually some people decided to put it into practice. The results were appalling: many, many, many Hollywood successes fail the test.

Ironically (or not so much), it also has been proven that movies which pass the Bechdel Test have a lower budget, make more money and and have a better overall return of investment than those which fail. Continue reading

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The Myth of Adam and Eve, or “The Original Binary”

Case study of biblical proportions

To explain our first myth, I’ll make use of another myth. We all know the allegedly “simple” story of Adam and Eve. Nothing could be more evident than the fact that men and women exist, right? Anyone can take a look around and verify this.

Adam-and-Eve-Not-Adam-and-Steve1

Image from ourcog.org

It was even used against same-sex marriage in many countries, including my own.

However, taking a closer look at the story will  reveal some nasty details.

To begin with, Eve wasn’t Adam’s first companion.

According to the Hebrew tradition:

“Adam and Lilith never found peace together; for when he wished to lie with her, she took offence at the recumbent posture he demanded.

‘Why must I lie beneath you?’ she asked. ‘I also was made from dust, and am therefore your equal.’

Because Adam tried to compel her obedience by force, Lilith, in a rage, uttered the magic name of God, rose into the air and left him. “

So, as we see here, the so-called binary is actually an interesting threesome: Adam turns out to be a very insistent guy who, at the end of his patience, decides it might be more effective to just go ahead and be a rapist.

Lilith was erased from the Catholic Bible, but she lives on in traditions and even in pop culture, always personifying a demon, vampire, assassin, and occasionally as a creator goddess.

And finally Eve, the conveninet wife, who makes no trouble, and incarnates a logic that goes: “in case of conflict, suppress the woman’s independence“.

Apart from the human chracters of the story, we have God, the highest authority, who first ignores Lilith demands for justice and then decides the best cure for Adam is… a quiet wife who suits his needs better. Continue reading